‘Structure of its Theme’ is the study of the facade of the iconic Neue Kreuzberger Zentrum (NKZ) building at Kottbusser Tor in Berlin. The antennas on the front of the building are converted into musical notes and become the score lines making up the structure of the building.
The reason for the large number of antennas at the Neue Kreuzberger Zentrum is connected to the origin of the building. Designed by Wolfgang Jokisch and John Uhl, it was built between 1969 and 1974 and was part of the first program of urban renewal in West Berlin.
It was negatively received and completely rejected by the local residents as it meant the demolition of many of the surrounding area’s buildings that had predated and survived the war. Moreover, the new building was designed to shelter a highway that would cross the neighborhood; hence its characteristic shape. NKZ was intended to accommodate the mass of immigrants that arrived as “guest workers”in the 60’s and 70’s due to the economic boom in West Germany. In Berlin’s case, this were mainly people of Turkish origin.
«I’m interested in the antennas as a connection tool to their culture of origin; like enormous ears or belly buttons connecting to a distant motherland. They become architectural elements, as the inhabitants of the building modify and personalize its appearance through an unintentional act of mere functionality. I am interested in the poetic act of encoding the physical facts through music, in this case obtaining a soundtrack which is defined by the tenants themselves, so fragile and connected to them, and exposed to be easily altered as soon as they have to change home.»

‘Structure of its Theme’ is the study of the facade of the iconic Neue Kreuzberger Zentrum (NKZ) building at Kottbusser Tor in Berlin. The antennas on the front of the building are converted into musical notes and become the score lines making up the structure of the building.
The reason for the large number of antennas at the Neue Kreuzberger Zentrum is connected to the origin of the building. Designed by Wolfgang Jokisch and John Uhl, it was built between 1969 and 1974 and was part of the first program of urban renewal in West Berlin.
It was negatively received and completely rejected by the local residents as it meant the demolition of many of the surrounding area’s buildings that had predated and survived the war. Moreover, the new building was designed to shelter a highway that would cross the neighborhood; hence its characteristic shape. NKZ was intended to accommodate the mass of immigrants that arrived as “guest workers”in the 60’s and 70’s due to the economic boom in West Germany. In Berlin’s case, this were mainly people of Turkish origin.
«I’m interested in the antennas as a connection tool to their culture of origin; like enormous ears or belly buttons connecting to a distant motherland. They become architectural elements, as the inhabitants of the building modify and personalize its appearance through an unintentional act of mere functionality. I am interested in the poetic act of encoding the physical facts through music, in this case obtaining a soundtrack which is defined by the tenants themselves, so fragile and connected to them, and exposed to be easily altered as soon as they have to change home.»